Tag Archives: Mike Williscraft

From the Publisher May/June 2018

ClubWest

(To view our May/June 2018 issue of ClubWEST online, click here.)

“Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”
– Benjamin Franklin

Interesting contrast in this month’s edition of ClubWest.

We have a profile of Grimsby Museum’s Death & Dying exhibit – on now until the end of June – something to which we can all relate and something from which none of us returns, unless you want to get into a whole reincarnation discussions, but we’ll park that and save it for another day.

Then we have the rebirth of passenger/commuter rail which will and is reshaping Grimsby (and eventually Beamsville) in ways it seems unlikely most residents cannot contemplate as yet.

It isn’t shocking there was a rail line to connect rural residents to an urban centre 100 years, but it is surprising to many to read that it was an electric system.

That had to be incredibly cutting edge in the early part of the 20th century.

It was interesting to find that the driving desire of the rail line’s construction was to ensure the system went right down Main Street to ensure passengers had access to Grimsby’s downtown shops. The opposite plan is underway with the GO train plans to create its hub at the Casablanca/QEW quadrant with – as town council calls it – a new main street being built along Winston Road.

The HG&B line is just one of the remarkable historical ditties which make this area so unique, so special.

How many out there in reader land know what the “honeymoon huts” were?

I know there will be a few and, no, if you work at the museum or volunteer at the archives you don’t count for the purposes of this unscientific survey. For anyone who emails me (mike@wn3.ca) with the correct answer – and I want an approximate physical location included, as opposed to simply what the huts were – I’ll have a nice little prize for you. I will do a draw from all correct answers.

These are the kinds of stories which cried out to be told in a publication like ClubWest Magazine when I launched the publication five years ago.

This area is so rich in history, characters and talent we’ll never run out of story subjects. In fact, it’s just the opposite. It is more of a chore to narrow the field when trying to plan copy for each edition. That noted, some of these historical anecdotes are the most difficult to unearth, so we welcome the offering of ideas which can prove like a flashlight illuminating a previously dark trail. Show me the way, I’ll do the rest!

Publisher, ClubWest Magazine
Mike Williscraft

From the Publisher March/April 2018

ClubWest

(To view our March/April 2018 issue of ClubWEST online, click here.)

“Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”
– Benjamin Franklin

If you’re looking for a grind ’em up, spit ’em out attitude of winning at any cost in minor lacrosse, Grimsby native Jamie Taylor is decidedly not your man.

If you want your youngster to gain some experience, learn about the game and themselves along the way and be the best they can be on both fronts, then you will be glad you read the feature on the former National Lacrosse League journeyman. Taylor will be a new coach in the Lincoln Crush minor lacrosse system and he brings a wealth of experience to the table.

As a former number one draft pick and someone who made many stops along the trail of his pro career, he will have a lot of insight to offer his players and their parents.

Surprises come along. Taylor’s career was not planned. It was almost a fluke, really, as he started out as a hockey player but found his skills flatlined. When he started cross-training with lacrosse, he immediately took flight and didn’t look back.

The ability to read the tea leaves and adapt are key in the world of sports, just as it is in business.

This month’s cover story on the ongoing development of Dillon’s Small Batch Distillery is proof positive of that.

Geoff Dillon and family members sensed an opportunity, did their homework and launched their new business, which was quite likely the easy part but getting it up and moving forward is the more difficult, ongoing battle.

Dillon and his team has listened repeatedly to what the market has told them and continued to adapt their offering to interest varied consumer interests and tastes. Being a good lis- tener can serve you in good stead no matter what line of work one is in and Dillon’s has picked up on that, clearly.

Starting out just over six years ago in what was, essentially, a little used drive shed on Tufford Road at the South Service Road in Beamsville, massive renovation and fine tuning has culminated in a unique consumer experience for anyone who has stopped by.

As owner of a small, independent publishing company, I know all too well the perils and benefits of going the entrepre- neurial route. A winning concoction is one part energy, one part smarts, one part creativity and one part crazy. Put all in a blender, mix well with anything from Dillon’s and you’ll be well on your way. Just kidding.

The first three parts are true, though. Great respect to Team Dillon’s and continued success and, as well, for Taylor with his lacrosse charges.

Publisher, ClubWest Magazine
Mike Williscraft

Back on Track

ClubWest

(To view our January/February 2018 issue of ClubWEST online, click here.)

Highly touted as a fourth overall Midget draft selection, Grimsby’s Brandon Saigeon has shown determintation, perseverance to overcome early obstacles.

By Joanne MacDonald

Brandon Saigeon wears #17 for the Major Junior Hamilton Bulldogs of the Ontario Hockey League, but his hometown Grimsby will always claim him as their own – and for lots of reasons that only start at centre ice.

Dynamic is a word sportswriters and scouts have used to describe his elite playing skills, competitive, driven, cerebral.

Off ice, he’s a thoughtful and respectful 19-year-old young man who measures every statement he makes to ensure it’s a nod of credit to the work of his entire team.

The Black and Gold went into the Christmas break on a five-game winning streak thanks to the 5-2 home-ice win Dec. 17 over the Peterborough Petes.

Before starting pre-school, Brandon was shooting tennis balls in the laneway by the hundred.

Hamilton’s powerplay was at work early in the first period. Ryan Moore scored to go ahead 1-0 and Saigeon also connected with the man advantage to make it 2-0 as the team cruised to the win.

Through 34 games, as of Christmas time, Saigeon leads the Bulldogs with 37 points, 17 of them goals. He also holds the top faceoff percentage on the team and leads the league in powerplay goals.

The Bulldogs wrapped up the first half of the regular season in first place in the East Division and first overall in the Eastern Conference. They’re in the thick of it and as of late December the Bulldogs stood with 48 points in 34 games with 21 wins and seven losses.

Predictions for the new year? Not taking a chance, Saigeon says with a smile – unwilling to jinx what has been a great start to the season – he’s just happy the hard work is paying off for the whole team and says there’s no other group of guys with which he would rather win.

Determination keeps Brandon Saigeon reaching for his goals, just like this one.

“I’m working hard for the Bulldogs right now. The farther we go in playoffs the more NHL interest there will be throughout our whole team,” he said.

Serious injury tested the mettle of the young hockey star when his second year in the OHL was cut short by almost half the season when he broke both forearm bones, shattering the radius and ulna in his left arm in a January 2016 game against the Mississauga Steelheads.

But he’s back with his signature work ethic and the resiliency that runs through his DNA.

By the age of three, Saigeon was shooting rows of tennis balls in the driveway at his netminding grandfather, Wayne Saigeon.

And his dad, Brent, an athlete who played competitive tennis at the national and international level and was a member of the Canadian Jr. Team, removed the tennis net from the backyard court and replaced it with two hockey nets.

Saigeon credits the support of his dad and mom, Charlotta – another athlete in the family’s star lineup – for teaching him how to carry himself as a young athlete working to achieve his goals.

Charlotta was an Olympic swimmer and competed at the 1984 Summer Games in Los Angeles.

“My Dad went to the University of Houston Texas on a tennis scholarship and it was there he met my Mom who was studying on a swimming scholarship.”

Brent says Brandon has always worked hard to improve his game.

“Whether it be shooting hundreds of pucks a night on our tennis court or running the hills at our local park for conditioning, he has always worked hard to get better.”

It’s a work ethic that has been passed down the family line. Says Brandon, “I think I got that edge earlier than most kids with my parents both being athletes and so supportive.”

To read the full article, click here for the January/February ClubWest online magazine.